Supporting Colorectal Cancer Charities

Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

New Video!

We’ve got a new video!

This is it!!

bumrun_balanse_logo_small_200x108

There’s just over one week to go until the big day is here.  In this issue we are recapping the incredible stories we have had the privilege of hearing about this year.  Click on the links below to learn more about our 2015 Balanse Bum Run Ambassadors and their designated charities.

This run is for Joseph Denny.  He’s behind the St. Joseph’s Health Centre Foundation.  Read his story here.

This run is for Daniel & Jack Brown.  They’re behind the Sick Kids GIFT Program.  Read their story here.

This run is for Marie Taurasi.

She’s behind the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada.

Read her story here.

This run is for Mark Brosens.  He’s behind Colon Cancer Canada.

Read his story here.

Now we need you #BumNation!  Help us reach our fundraising goal for these four amazing charities.  There are some awesome fundraising prizes to be won including:

˜˜˜ * Signed Toronto FC Soccer Ball

Niagara Helicopter Tour

* Spa Gift Certificates

Whole Foods Gift Baskets

Barreworks Class Package 

* Rocket Cycle Package

* Danier Leather Gift Cards

& More!

Help us make this year our best one yet.  Remember all proceeds go to your charity of choice!

The Backside Issue 12 – Meet Mark Brosens

Mark Brosens and his fiancée, Fiona.  They are running in the Balanse Bum Run for Mark’s Aunt Linda and Uncle Tom & are asking you to support Colon Cancer Canada
“Both Linda and Tom have taught me not to let embarrassment get in the way of early detection.”
Mark first ran the Balanse Bum Run in 2014.  His team name, “Run for Linda,” is in honour of his Aunt Linda, who was undergoing chemotherapy during last year’s run. Sadly, Linda passed away in late May, 2014.  Mark’s uncle Tom also passed away from colorectal cancer 14 years ago when Mark was 17 years old.  This is Mark’s message for you.
Click on Mark or Fiona to sponsor them – they are asking you to get behind Colon Cancer Canada and to get educated about screening & prevention. 
Mark’s Aunt Linda – the inspiration for his team name, “Run for Linda” – she passed away after a long battle with Colorectal Cancer just one month after Mark completed his first Balanse Bum Run. 
Click here to Sponsor:
Mark Brosens
AGE: 31
HOME TOWN: Bradford, Ontario

PASSION: The news, reading large non-fiction books,
home brewing, cooking, and running

BR: Can you tell us about how you came to learn about the Balanse Bum Run?

MB: I first heard about the Balanse Bum Run in 2012 while participating in a Running Room half marathon class. The instructors were listing a bunch of runs that we could do in preparation for the big race and the Balanse Bum Run was in the list. Everyone laughed at the name, but when the instructors explained that it was for colorectal cancer awareness, it stuck with me. My Uncle Tom had passed away from colorectal cancer when I was 17 years old, after fighting the disease for about two years, so I understood how awful this form of cancer could be.

However, I didn’t actually participate in the Balanse Bum Run for the first time until 2014 when my Aunt Linda was in the late stages of her own fight with colorectal cancer. She passed away on May 24, 2014, after fighting for about two years. My fiancée and I created a Balanse Bum Run team named “Run for Linda” in her honour.

BR:  Was your Aunt Linda well enough to know that you participated in the run last year?

MB
: Linda was very sick during last year’s run, so I don’t think she knew that I was doing this. However, she was a nurse and she volunteered at Kelowna, B.C.’s cancer centre, so I know she would have appreciated what I was doing. That being said, another part of my motivation for doing the run in 2014 was to support my Mom, who was struggling with Linda’s illness. It felt like I couldn’t do much to help, but I could do this.

BR: What message do you want the world to know about Colorectal Cancer?

MB: Both Aunt Linda and Uncle Tom knew for a while that something was wrong with their colons before they went to see a doctor. I think both of them were scared and embarrassed to talk about it. For instance, Linda used her medical knowledge to self-diagnose herself with Irritable Bowel Syndrome. I can understand where they were coming from, because without their example, I think I’d respond the exact same way. However, from what I understand, they would have had a much better chance of beating the disease if they would have gone to the doctor sooner. In Tom’s case, when he was having 18 inches of his colon removed in an attempt to stop the disease, the surgeons discovered that the cancer had already started to spread throughout his body, so they hadn’t got there in time.

Both Linda and Tom have taught me not to let embarrassment get in the way of early detection.

BR: What have been the highlights and downfalls about the Balanse Bum Run for you?

MB: They’ve all been highlights for me! I’ve done a lot of runs in Toronto and I, honestly, have to say that the Balanse Bum Run is one of my favourites. Partially, that’s because it’s a fun route and last year I was randomly given a new pair of Lululemon shorts at the finish line (I don’t think everyone got those!) (BR: Nope – Lululemon surprised some random runners – lucky you!) But more than anything, I think I enjoyed last year’s run so much because I felt like I was helping. My highlight from this year has been the overwhelming support that I’ve received from family, friends, and colleagues. I hoped to raise $300 this year and I’m at almost $800 with just less than a month until the race!

BR: Have you been screened yet and what do you think will encourage more people to participate colorectal screening?

MB: I haven’t got screened yet, but I will when I get a little older. In the meantime, I’ve completed Cancer Care Ontario’s “My Cancer IQ” online assessment (you can do it here: https://www.mycanceriq.ca/). It told me that my risk of developing colorectal cancer was average to below-average (I took the test twice: once answering optimistically, once answering more pessimistically). I was pleasantly surprised by those results, because I assumed my chances of developing colorectal cancer would have been very high, since I have a history of it on both sides of my family. My biggest take away from that assessment is that I need to eat more fruits and vegetables, so I have been trying to do that. Also, the assessment told me that I need to continue to keep my alcohol consumption at a moderate level, which – as a home brewer – I try to stay mindful of.
 
Both my parents have been diligent about their screenings after their siblings got sick. Really, I think information and example will encourage people to be screened.

BR: How would you characterize your running skills on a scale of Tortoise beginner to Hare speed demon?

MB: “Speed demon” is a relative term. After participating in races with thousands-on-thousands of other of runners, I’ve realized I’ll likely never come in first place or in last place. That drove home for me that an individual’s own personal performance means more than their performance relative to everyone else. For example, in the 2014 Balanse Bum Run, I finished in 100th place, which I thought was terrific. However, my fiancée, Fiona, was the star of the day when she crossed the finish line a few minutes after me with her personal best 5K time. As corny as it sounds, I think everyone should just have fun and do their best regardless of how Tortoise or Hare-like they are. After all, you get to run down the middle of some of Toronto’s busiest roads – how cool is that?!
 
BR: If your bum could talk, what would it say?

MB
: “Don’t be an a**, have your bum checked regularly.” Linda’s son, Bob, gave me that one.

BR: You are officially a citizen of #BumNation. Is there anything you want to say to prospective Balanse Bum Run recruits?

MB: I think awareness is more important than your run time or the amount of money you raise. Whenever I post about the run on social media, I try to include a link to signs of colorectal cancer. I don’t care if a friend doesn’t have enough money to give me a donation, but if they can learn something about colorectal cancer through the Balanse Bum Run, then that’s well worth it. In 2014, colorectal cancer was the second leading cause of cancer death in Canada, so even if you can’t walk or run in the Balanse Bum Run on April 26, let people know about the disease any way that you can.

The Bum Run Team thanks Mark for sharing his Aunt Linda and Uncle Tom with us to help raise awareness about Colon Cancer Canada.

 

Colon Cancer Canada is a national organization dedicated to saving lives through increasing public awareness of colorectal cancer and access to screening, funding research initiatives, and providing colorectal cancer patient support.

For More From The Backside including how you can win a stunning pair of diamond and 18kt white gold earrings worth $980 generously donated by Jared Brown Designs, click Here

The Backside Issue 11 – Meet Marie Taurasi and The CCAC

Meet Marie Taurasi

Marie Taurasi and her family.  Marie is participating in the Balanse Bum Run for the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada. 

“This is not an “old person’s disease.”  If you are having any types of symptoms – go and have yourself checked.

This is what saved me – a colonoscopy

Click here to Sponsor:

Marie Taurasi
AGE: 43
HOME TOWN: Richmond Hill
PASSION: Family Time

BR: Can you tell us about your affiliation with CCAC?

MT:  I met Filomena with the CCAC through a mutual friend. This organization isamazing!  They help me, educate me, and most importantly, support me through this journey of mine.    

BR:  What message do you want the world to know about Colon Cancer? 

MT:  Colon Cancer is 90% preventable if detected early.  So do your part and get a colonoscopy because this cancer is treatable & beatable!  

BR: Do you have a personal mantra?

MT:  I have a lot to live for.  I have two beautiful kids.  My son is going to University in the Fall for medicine, and my daughter will be starting high school in the Fall as well.  I need to be around for them – to see their accomplishments and to help guide them.  My husband and I hope to buy a house on the lake one day and grow old together.   

BR:  Have you been part of the Balanse Bum Run before?

MT:  No, I have not been part of the Balanse Bum Run before but I am looking forward to it and am participating with family and friends.
  
BR:  How would you characterize your running skills on a scale of “Homer Simpson Beginner” to “Tazmanian Devil Speed Demon”?

MT: I’m not an advocate runner but I do like to take long walks with my husband.  

BR: What do you think will encourage more people to participate in colorectal screening?  

MT:  This is not an “old person’s disease.”  If you are having any types of symptoms – go and have yourself checked.  This is what saved me – a colonoscopy.

BR:  If your bum could talk, what would it say?

MT:  “If you want me to stick behind you – make sure you do your screening tests!”

BR:  You are officially a citizen of #BumNation. Is there anything you want to say to prospective Balanse Bum Run recruits?

MT:  This is an amazing campaign to make people aware of this disease.  Together, we need to tell people our stories so that they don’t think they are alone in fighting this.  We are a group of strong individuals of all ages! 

Marie was diagnosed with Colorectal Cancer on January 19, 2015.  She had a temporary ileostomy put in on February 6, 2015, and is now undergoing chemotherapy and radiation treatments.  Marie is grateful for the help and support of the Colorectal Association of Canada for educating and guiding her through this journey. 
The Bum Run Team thanks Marie for sharing her very new story to help raise awareness about the CCAC.
The CCAC is dedicated to increasing awareness of colorectal cancer, supporting patients, and advocating for population-based screening and timely access to effective treatments. 
The CCAC is bringing the Giant Colon Tour to the Balanse Bum Run!  A 40 ft long, 8 ft high colon — an exhibition for all ages featuring the pathologies that may be found inside the human colon.  Don’t miss it! (It will be hard to miss.)

For More From The Backside click Here

The Backside Issue 10 – Meet Daniel and Jack Brown

 

Meet Daniel & Jack Brown

Daniel Brown and his 5-year old son, Jack.
Warning: All photos in this issue are insanely cute & beautiful.

“The GIFT program is one of a kind.

Since the program’s inception they have reduced the number of intestinal failure related deaths in children from 25% to less than 1%.

I hope that with continued support,
we can get that number down to zero.”
In 2009, Jack was born missing most of his small bowel. He wasn’t supposed to survive.  Fortunately, Sick Kids Hospital had a specialized program for children like Jack with complicated intestinal related issues.  The GIFT team (Group for the Improvement of Intestinal Function and Treatment) helped Jack survive and thrive.
The Family Brown.

DANIEL BROWN

AGE: 37

HOME TOWN: Richmond Hill

PASSION: Definitely not running!

TEAM:  The Jackaroos

Click on any team member’s name to sponsor them and Sick Kids’ GIFT program
BR: Can you tell us about how the Sick Kids GIFT Program – one of our designated charities this year – has affected your life?

DB:  Initially we felt very unlucky. Very few kids each year are born with Jack’s medical condition. However, we soon became very optimistic after meeting with the GIFT team which included doctors, nurses, dieticians and occupational therapists. Jack wouldn’t have survived without the GIFT program.

BR:  What message do you want the world to know about GIFT? 

DB:  The GIFT program is one of a kind. Since the program’s inception they have reduced the number of intestinal failure related deaths in children from 25% to less than 1%. I hope that with continued support, we can get that number down to zero.

BR: Do you have a personal mantra?

DB:  Joan Baez once said, “Action is the antidote to despair.” I am committed to doing what I can to raise awareness and funding for GIFT so that children born with intestinal challenges can get the treatment they need. 

BR:  Have you been part of the Balanse Bum Run before?

DB:  This is our first year doing the Bum Run. We are bringing the entire family out to participate in the run including my wife, parents, siblings and in-laws. We will also have our closest friends running alongside us to help raise awareness for GIFT.  We are aiming to raise at least $10,000.
  
BR:  How would you characterize your running skills on a scale of “Homer Simpson Beginner” to “Tazmanian Devil Speed Demon”?

DB: I’m more like the tortoise than the hare. Slow and steady.

BR: Can you tell us about how Jack is doing today?  

DB:  Jack is doing great. He is a rambunctious five year old who loves to play sports, video games and torture his little sister.  He still sees the GIFT team regularly to monitor his progress and receive dietary advice. Overall he is happy and healthy.

BR:  You are officially a citizen of #BumNation. Is there anything you want to say to prospective Bum Run recruits?

DB:  Almost anyone can run a 5k. The hardest part of the race is committing to participate. 

The Sick Kids GIFT Program is one of four charities that our participants & sponsors can designate to receive their donations.  GIFT is the only formal intestinal rehabilitation program in Canada, and has almost eliminated mortality from intestinal failure associated liver disease since 2007.
The Bum Run Team is so grateful to Daniel & his family for sharing Jack’s story to help raise awareness about the Sick Kids GIFT Program.

 

Click here to see Dr. Ian Bookman and last year’s Ambassador, David Brown, on BT Toronto!

bt

 

For More From The Backside click Here

The Backside Issue 9 – The Runners Shop Is Behind Us!

The Runners Shop
has a gift for you!

The Runners Shop is one of the key sponsors of the BALANSE BUM RUN and this year they are celebrating their 40th Anniversary!

As part of their celebrations they are organizing The Runners Shop 40th Anniversary Race Series – a multi series incorporating many local Toronto races including the BALANSE BUM RUN!!

Click on this link for more details – it is open to everyone, of any ability, and entry to the Series is FREE. The more races you do the more points you accrue and a bigger chance of winning some GREAT prizes!!

Register for the Series, let them know you have entered the BALANSE BUM RUN, and you will receive a $10 Store Coupon!!

runners shop

  • MULTI RACE SERIES FEATURING MANY OF YOUR FAVOURITE LOCAL TORONTO RACES
  • ENTRY TO THE SERIES IS FREE!!
  • STORE COUPONS FOR EVERY RACE ENTERED
  • AGE GRADED SCORING GIVES EVERYONE A FIGHTING CHANCE!
  • AGE GRADED PRIZING FOR EVERY RACE AND SERIES WINNERS
  • COMPLETE 3 OUT OF 6 RACES TO QUALIFY FOR GRAND PRIZES

More info and sign up at www.therunnersshop.com

For more from The Backside click Here

The Backside Issue 8 – Meet Joseph

Meet Joseph Denny
& Team “Buttheads Unite”


dennyfamily

Joseph is our 2015 Balanse Bum Run Ambassador for
St. Joseph’s Health Centre Foundation
(The name is just coincidence, we swear!)

“…You need to be part of
this campaign to save as many lives
as possible.
People need to hear your story.”

Joseph has undergone seven cancer surgeries for colorectal cancer and the removal of melanoma and metastatic melanoma cancers, including several large and deep ones on his scalp, the removal of the lower lobe of his lung, cancer in the groin area, and part of his ear. He has also survived two rounds of endocarditis, which left him with some neural damage and, as a result, a seizure disorder. When people ask him about his many visible scars, he always starts out by saying: ‘Well, there was this bar in Oklahoma . . . ‘

denny

JOSEPH DENNY
AGE: 61
HOME TOWN: Toronto

PASSION: Building & Renovating. Sometime soon I hope to be well enough to be able to build us another house (maybe in California this time).

TEAM: Buttheads Unite.  Joseph, his wife Sue and his daughter Sarah are all registered.  Sarah is running for the team.

BR: Can you tell us about your connection to one of our designated charities this year: St. Joseph’s Health Centre Foundation?

JD: I am a regular patient at St. Joseph’s Health Centre. All of the doctors and staff are great at this hospital. I have regular visits and follow-ups with several doctors in Oncology, Cardiology, Neurology, and ENT (for Thyroid). I have had several surgeries and numerous tests and scans at St. Joseph’s. I have become a regular at the CT Scan unit at St. Joseph’s after over 20 scans.

BR: You discovered you had Colon Cancer in 2007 by accident. Can you tell us what happened?

I was in the hospital for another extended stay to combat Endocarditis. I was on a large volume of antibiotics and I started to notice some blood in my stool. I was told that this was quite common as this large amount of penicillin would irritate the intestines to the point of noticing some bleeding. My wife requested that they do further investigation and I was sent for a colonoscopy. Dr. Bookman performed the colonoscopy on me. I was scheduled to have a Sigmoidoscopy – a short scope that is done lower down in the large intestine, as it was believed that the irritation would be found very close to the rectum. I was sedated but not fully sedated as it was only going to be a short scope. Dr. Bookman found the source of the bleeding from the irritation just as expected. At that point, a nurse entered the room to inform Dr. Bookman that his next patient had rescheduled. Since he had extra time, he asked me if he could proceed further with the scope, beyond the original plan. He did and after a few minutes he found a large cancer tumour. I had surgery two weeks later. I was very fortunate that it was detected when it was as it was very close to spreading.

I will always remember this incident and ask myself, “What if the next patient was ready for his colonoscopy and I was sent to the recovery room before discovering the cancer?” “What if Dr. Bookman, after finding the irritation as expected, did not ask me if he could look further?” “What if Dr. Bookman had any other reason to spend a few minutes doing some other important work rather than continuing to do an unscheduled colonoscopy on me?”

I am alive today because of the knowledge and skill and great caring of Dr. Bookman. I am alive today because he discovered this cancer just in time. I am a firm believer in having regular colonoscopies.

BR: In light of this incredible twist of fate, what message do you want the world to know about Colon Cancer?

JD: Everyone needs to know that early detection of colorectal cancer can save their lives. It is important to educate everyone on the need for regular screening. I was fortunate enough to have a colonoscopy performed on me for an entirely different reason when Dr. Bookman discovered that I had colorectal cancer. Early detection of this cancer saved my life and is the key to beating this cancer.

BR: Do you have a personal mantra?

JD: I constantly tell myself that I have a lot to live for. I keep repeating this phrase in my mind during every surgery, every test, every scan and when I am having a ‘bad’ day. I want to spend as much time as possible with my wife and daughter. I tell myself that I want to live to be the oldest person alive. I want to live to be over 112 years old. Life is filled with too many wonderful things not to do everything in your power to prevent, detect and correct medical problems.

BR: What do you think will encourage more people to participate in colorectal screening?

JD: I believe that people need to understand that they have an amazing opportunity to survive colorectal cancer if it is detected early. A colonoscopy is not as intrusive as people may think. The preparation may be a little inconvenient for some people, but as long as you keep a good magazine in the washroom everything else is easy. The process is so simple and safe and it does not hurt. The staff and nurses in the prep and recovery room are wonderful at easing any of your worries. During the procedure you are sedated enough to have a gentle nap and when you wake up in the recovery room they even give you a free apple juice. How can you beat that?

BR: How would you characterize Sarah’s running skills on a scale of Homer Simpson beginner to Tazmanian devil speed demon?

JD: My daughter ran her first 5K last summer and has embraced a healthy eating and living lifestyle. Her running skills are still closer to the beginner end but she is doing amazingly well. I am able to walk only short distances due to several other health issues.

BR: If your bum could talk, what would it say?

JD: “If you want to continue to sit on me then you must promise to look after me and have regular screenings”.

BR: You are officially a citizen of #BumNation. Is there anything you want to say to prospective Bum Run recruits?

You need to be part of this campaign to save as many lives as possible. People need to hear your story. I tell almost everyone I meet that having a colonoscopy saved my life by detecting it early (well, I do not tell them this story during dinner).

The Backside Issue 7 – Meet Richard

Richard Crouse is Behind Us.

Richard Crouse

“…my story of detection and treatment isn’t about me. It’s a more universal story and my reason for sharing it is that if this could happen to me, it could happen to you. Treat me as a cautionary tale and call your doctor.”

If you don’t know who Richard Crouse is, you probably don’t watch a lot of movies…. or you watch a lot of bad ones. He can help you with that. A Canadian pundit on all things film – Richard is a film critic, author, broadcaster, regular contributor to CTV’s Canada AM, and so much more.

In March 2014, Richard revealed his diagnosis & butt-kicking year with colorectal cancer in his regular column in the Metro News. In March 2015, for Colon Cancer Awareness Month, he’s continuing to spread the word – Colon Cancer does not have to be a feature film. We all have the power to shrink it to a credit note. By no means does it get a leading role.

This is his message but not his story.

Richard Crouse 2

RICHARD CROUSE
AGE: 51
HOME TOWN: Toronto (by way of Liverpool, Nova Scotia and several other places)

BR: Looking back, do you think there may have been symptoms that you dismissed or was it entirely silent? Is there a family history?

RC: I’m a non-smoker, moderate drinker and I watch my diet. I even eat kale. Entire gardens of it. I’m surprised there isn’t a kale shortage in the world given the amount of it I go through on a weekly basis. When I was diagnosed with colon cancer I had no symptoms, felt fine and only went for the colonoscopy because my doctor told me I had to due to my age. He made the appointment for me, gave me the time, date and address for the procedure. If it was left up to me, I probably would have procrastinated. There’s always something better to do than have a colonoscopy… at least I thought so until I was diagnosed. These days I’m a convert and loudly preach the colonoscopy gospel to anyone who’ll listen.

On the day I had the colonoscopy, I thought it was a procedure so routine I’d be in and out and on my way in no time, like getting a flu shot or a tooth filled. I even made lunch reservations at a favorite restaurant as a reward for not being able to eat for twenty-four hours in preparation for the test.

I ended up cancelling those reservations. There is no way to prepare for the doctor squeezing your arm and saying, “I’m sorry, we’ve found a tumour.” Those six simple words went on to inform the next months of my life.

There is a history of cancer in my family. My mother died of breast cancer when she was still a young woman and my father has been troubled by melanoma, but I didn’t discover he had a colon cancer scare several years ago until long after I was diagnosed.

Bottom line (no pun intended) is that no matter your family history, or whether you are displaying symptoms or not, it’s crucial to get tested. It could save your life. It saved mine.

BR: Do you have a personal mantra that got you through diagnosis, treatment and beyond?

RC: I began the journey with the usual shock but quickly skipped ahead, past denial, to anger. I was mad that all I had worked for could possibly be sidelined by a bullet shaped tumor in my colon; a dark spot that had grown quietly and insidiously inside me for the past few years.

The anger stage was quickly replaced by acceptance after long talks with my ever-rosy girlfriend Andrea, and the cadre of doctors brought in to assess me.

I decided to live my life with as little disruption as possible. It was my way of saying “Screw You, Cancer, you’re not making the rules, I am”. Optimistic maybe, but I firmly believe that a good attitude is one of the keys to leading a healthy life even in the face of serious medical issues.

BR: If your bum could talk, what would it say?

RC: It would probably tell me to stop being a smart ass.

BR: You have had such a tremendous career to date. You say that your experience with colon cancer isn’t your story – that it is your message. If someone turned your life story into a movie, would you include your encounter with Colon Cancer and, if so, how much of your movie would you dedicate to it?

RC: It would be a footnote. At least that is my hope. I refuse to be defined by the disease. If I can encourage people to get tested, that’s great, but my story of detection and treatment isn’t about me. It’s a more universal story and my reason for sharing it is that if this could happen to me, it could happen to you. Treat me as a cautionary tale and call your doctor.

BR: For fun, if you could pick any actor to play you in your biopic, who would it be?

RC: The love child of George Clooney and Zach Galifanikas.

BR: Any final words for our readers?

RC: This experience doesn’t have to define you. It can easily overwhelm everything in your life, but only if you let it. I was determined to push through. I went to movies, wrote reviews and continued all my radio and TV work. I even wrote a book. For me, keeping busy was the best medicine.

Check out Richard’s new book, coming out in April:
Elvis is King: Costello’s My Aim is True
(http://www.ecwpress.com/books/elvis-king)

The Backside Issue 6

GetAttachmentYOUR TO DO LIST FOR FEBRUARY:

1. Sign up for the 2015 Balanse Bum Run.

2. Get our early-bird discount: pay only $35 if you register before the end of February.

3. Tell your friends about the most fun run in the city by sharing this newsletter on Facebook: Like The Backside, Issue 6 is here! on Facebook and Twitter: share on Twitter

4. It’s the month of love so sign up a friend too!

5. And, finally, follow us on social media to stay informed about #PooFacts like this:

Geese poo once every 12 minutes.

For more from The Backside visit
http://eepurl.com/bdQQ8P

The Backside, Issue 5 – Meet Sarah

Issue 5, April 9, 2014
Read the original version HERE

Backside - Issue 5
Meet Sarah
Bio-K+ Bum Run Ambassador 2014
Captain of “Team Cheeky”
Age: 34
Hometown: Pickering
Superpower: Mommy (we love this superpower!)

“My case is pretty rare but I want people to know that this can and DOES happen. I have been blessed with an amazing support system and fantastic doctors. I hope to be around for a very long time to advocate for early screening & detection :).”
— Sarah Roy, Butt-Kicker.

The Bio-K+ Bum Run Team salutes Sarah for her courage and strength during this challenging time. She may not be with us in body on race day but we will all be honouring her determination – we are so grateful to have her as our Ambassador.
Now let’s RUN!

Sarah is our final Bio-K+ Bum Run Ambassador of 2014. She was recently diagnosed with Colon Cancer. This year, CC is preventing her from being with us on race day but she is not letting it stop her from fighting for awareness.

BR: Why did you choose to sign up for the Bio-K+ Bum Run?

SR: In November of 2013 I was diagnosed with Stage II Colon Cancer. I had been having symptoms for over 2 years and finally went to get checked. I feel so blessed to have caught it early and I want to spread the word on the importance of early detection, diligent screening, and debunking stereotypes. Colon cancer isn’t just a disease that affects men and it doesn’t always wait until after you turn 50. Education is key to helping people understand that this shouldn’t be taboo.

BR: What will be your greatest motivation on race day?

SR: My family. I am a wife and mother to three beautiful children (ages 8, 6 and 3) and every step in my journey is propelled by their love and support.

BR: Who or what inspires you on a daily basis?

SR: I have two friends (Jennifer and Stephanie) that fought and won their battles against breast cancer. These beautiful and courageous women fought their battles with grace and poise and I often draw from their strength to push me through my journey.

BR: Do you have a personal mantra?

SR: Not a mantra per se, but I constantly remind myself that my cancer doesn’t define me. It does drive me to be a better, healthier me. I am determined to take everything I have learned and use it to better not only my own life, but that of my family, friends and those I meet along the way.

BR: What do you think will encourage more people to participate in colorectal screening?

SR: People need to understand that testing for colorectal cancer isn’t as horrible as they think it will be. The stigma surrounding “that area” needs to be demolished. A 15 minute exam could save your life.

BR: If your bum could talk, what would it say?

SR: At this point it would probably say “leave me alone”!!! My bum and I are much closer now that we have taken this journey together. I have learned to respect my tushy and listen when it talks to me 😉

BR: You are officially a citizen of Bumnation. Is there anything you want to say to prospective recruits?

SR: Don’t be afraid. Colorectal cancer is one of the most curable and treatable when caught early. Listen to your body. Understand that doctors are not to be feared and a 15 minute test could save your life. Lean on our amazing community for support. You will find that when you open up about YOUR journey that there are so many people that have walked this path before you and want to share their story too.

My case is pretty rare but I want people to know that this can and DOES happen.
I have been blessed with an amazing support system and fantastic doctors. I hope to be around for a very long time to advocate for early screening and detection
:)

Latest Posts

  • New Video! New Video!
    We’ve got a new video!...
  • This is it!! This is it!!
    There’s just over one week to go until the big day is here.  In this issue...

Bumrun on Twitter

Follow Balanse Bum Run




Balanse Bum Run
14845 Yonge St.,
Unit 6, Suite 255
Aurora, Ontario L4G 6H8

Website: www.bumrun.com
Email: office@bumrun.com
Support from:
RunningRoom